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TARGET 21. Ensure That Knowledge Is Available and Accessible To Guide Biodiversity Action

TARGET 21. Ensure That Knowledge Is Available and Accessible To Guide Biodiversity Action

Ensure that the best available data, information and knowledge, are accessible to decision makers, practitioners and the public to guide effective and equitable governance, integrated and participatory management of biodiversity, and to strengthen communication, awareness-raising, education, monitoring, research and knowledge management and, also in this context, traditional knowledge, innovations, practices and technologies of indigenous peoples and local communities should only be accessed with their free, prior and informed consent, * in accordance with national legislation.

Free, prior and informed consent refers to the tripartite terminology of “prior and informed consent” or “free, prior and informed consent” or “approval and involvement.

Headline indicator
  • 21.1 Indicator on biodiversity information for the monitoring the Kunming-Montreal Global Biodiversity Framework
Component indicator
  • Species Status Index
  • Extent to which (a) global citizenship education and (b) education for sustainable development, including gender equality and human rights, are mainstreamed at all levels in: (i) national education policies, (ii) curricula, (iii) teacher education and (iv) student assessments
Complementary indicator
  • Growth in number of records and species in the Living Planet Index database
  • Growth in species occurrence records accessible through the Global Biodiversity Information Facility
  • Growth in marine species occurrence records accessible through the Ocean Biodiversity Information System (OBIS)
  • Proportion of known species assessed through The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species™
  • Number of assessments on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species™
  • World Association of Zoos and Aquariums (WAZA) bioliteracy survey (Biodiversity literacy in global zoo and aquarium visitors)
  • Species Status Information Index

Mapping with SECOND GLOBAL PLAN OF ACTION FOR PLANT GENETIC RESOURCES FOR FOOD AND AGRICULTURE

Mapping with Sustainable Development Goals

SDG Target 14.a

Increase scientific knowledge, develop research capacity and transfer marine technology, taking into account the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission Criteria and Guidelines on the Transfer of Marine Technology, in order to improve ocean health and to enhance the contribution of marine biodiversity to the development of developing countries, in particular small island developing States and least developed countries

Mapping with SAMARKAND STRATEGIC PLAN FOR MIGRATORY SPECIES 2024-2032

Target 4.1. By 2029, Parties have access to relevant information and evidence-based guidance to effectively implement the Convention, its Resolutions and Decisions.

Explanation: Parties play a key role in providing information at a national scale, but this can also be supported by the CMS Secretariat, through facilitation of the State of the World’s Migratory Species report and other knowledge products, if resources are available. The availability of this information is critical for decision-making and implementation of the CMS, its Resolutions and Decisions and associated guidance. Parties are able to understand and analyse the best available science and information on species, habitats and ranges in a way that enables them to prioritize and collaboratively take effective conservation action. 

Target 5.2. By 2029 and beyond, all Parties inform the COP, through National Reports, of measures taken to implement the Convention, its Resolutions and Decisions.

Explanation: Parties commit to completing National Reports each triennium, and actively contribute to improving the National Reporting process to ensure the best available information on the state of implementation of the CMS mandate. This information is compiled and used for prioritization and adaptation of CMS initiatives for migratory species conservation. 

Target 5.3. Parties use best available science, as the basis for evidence-based advice and decision-making to address the conservation of migratory species, their habitats and threats under CMS.

Explanation: Parties commit to use the best available science for decision-making and share information to ensure adequate implementation of the CMS mandate. Through the COP and its subsidiary bodies, Parties collaboratively ensure there is adequate monitoring of the implementation of the CMS mandate and agree to modify, improve or cancel existing initiatives based on best available science, with the aim of increasing their efficiency and impact, taking into account the knowledge of Indigenous People and Local Communities.

Target 6.1. By 2026, awareness of the importance of migratory species and their role in providing benefits for people has increased globally.

Explanation: Parties undertake actions, with the support of the CMS Secretariat, that increase the international recognition of the importance of migratory species, their habitats and the ecosystem services they provide. 

Target 6.2. By 2026, awareness of the role, purpose and achievements of CMS has increased globally.

Explanation: Parties undertake actions, with the support of the CMS Secretariat, that increase the international recognition of the role of CMS, and its contribution to the strategic goals of other multilateral environmental agreements, IGOs, NGOs and CMS stakeholders. 

Mapping with 4th Ramsar Strategic Plan 2016-2024

Ramsar Target 8

National wetland inventories have been initiated, completed or updated and disseminated and used for promoting the conservation and effective management of all wetlands.

Baseline
  • At COP12, 47% of Parties have a complete national wetlands inventory. (National Reports to COP12).
  • At COP13, [XX]% of Parties % of Parties have updated their national inventories in the last decade. (New question for National Reports).
Indicator
  • % of Parties that have complete national wetland inventories. (Data source: National Reports).
  • % of Parties that have updated their national inventories in the last decade. (Data source: new question for National Reports).
Ramsar Target 14

Scientific guidance and technical methodologies at global and regional levels are developed on relevant topics and are available to policy makers and practitioners in an appropriate format and language.

Baseline
  • In 2015, [543] ‘hits’ on scientific and technical guidance pages of the Ramsar web-site. (Data source: Google Analytics Ramsar web-site, May-June, 2015).
  • In 2015, [60] ‘hits’ on STRP briefing notes from the Ramsar web-site. (Data source: Google Analytics Ramsar web-site, May-June, 2015)).
  • In 2015, [176] ‘hits’ of relevant Ramsar Handbooks downloaded from the Ramsar web-site (Data source: Google Analytics Ramsar web-site, May-June, 2015).
  • In 2015, [150} practical tools and guidance documents for wetland conservation and wise use, and other key scientific documentation, which has been developed by either STRP, Parties and others, and is available via the Ramsar website. (Data source: Ramsar web-site).
Indicator
  • Number of ‘hits’ on scientific and technical guidance pages of the Ramsar web-site and associated subtotals by country and Ramsar Region of the source of these hits. (Data source: Ramsar web-site analytics).
  • Number of STRP briefing papers downloaded from the Ramsar website and subtotals by country and Ramsar Region of the source of these downloads. (Data source: Ramsar web-site analytics).
  • Number of relevant Ramsar Handbooks downloaded from the Ramsar web-site and subtotals by country and Ramsar Region of the source of these downloads. (Data source: Ramsar web-site analytics).
  • Number of practical tools and guidance documents for wetland conservation and wise use, and other key scientific documentation, which has been developed by either STRP, Parties and others, and is available via the Ramsar website. (Data source: Ramsar web-site).

Possible further indicators that may be developed

  • {Indicator(s) related to the use of guidance and availability in various language versions}.
Ramsar Target 16

Wetlands conservation and wise use are mainstreamed through communication, capacity development, education, participation and awareness.

Baseline

World Wetland Day

  • 89% of Parties have branded Word Wetlands Day activities. (National Reports to COP12).
  • In 2015 884 World Wetland Day activities or events reported to the Secretariat. (Data source: Ramsar Secretariat CEPA program)
  • In 2015, [379} internet references (in the press) to World Wetland Day activities. (Data source: Meltwater internet analysis).
  • In 2015, [58, 566} individual visits to the World Wetlands Day website. {Data source: worldwetlandsday.org website }.
  • In 2015 Social media links to World Wetland Day: 16,135,974 people reached in FaceBook . (Data source: https://www.facebook.com/RamsarConventionOnWetlands) .
  • 795 views of WWD message from Youtube channel (Data source Ramsar Youtube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/RamsarConvention)
  • 292,100 reached in Twitter (Data source https://twitter.com/RamsarConv)

CEPA programmes

  • 80% of Parties with a) a governmental CEPA National Focal Point and 69% of Parties with b) a non-governmental National Focal Point. (Data source: Ramsar Secretariat Data Base and National Reports to COP12).
  • 27% of Parties have established national action plans for wetland CEPA. (National Reports to COP12).

Visitor centres

  • By COP12, 636 centres (visitor centres, interpretation centres, education centres) have been established in Ramsar sites. (National Reports to COP12).
  • By COP12, 309 centres established at other wetlands. (National Reports to COP12).
Indicator

World Wetland Day

  • % of Parties that have branded World Wetlands Day activities. (Data source: National Reports).
  • Number of World Wetland Day activities or events reported to the Secretariat. (Data source: Ramsar CEPA program).
  • Number of internet references to World Wetland Day activities. {Data source: internet analysis}.
  • Number of internet references to the Ramsar Convention. {Data source: internet analysis}.
  • Number of social media links to World Wetland Day. {Data source: social media analysis}.

CEPA programmes

  • % of Parties with a) a governmental CEPA National Focal Point and b) a non-governmental National Focal Point (Data source: National Reports).
  • % of Parties that have established national action plans for wetland CEPA. (Data source: National Reports).

Visitor centres

  • Number of centres (visitor centres, interpretation centres, education centres) have been established in Ramsar Sites. (Data source: National Reports).
  • Number of centres at other wetlands. (Data source: National Reports).

Possible further indicators that may be developed

  • {Indicator(s) related to whether and how wetland conservation and wise-use issues are included formal education programmes}

Mapping with CITES Strategic Vision: 2021-2030

Objective 2.3 Parties have sufficient information to enforce the Convention

Objective 2.3 Parties have sufficient information to enforce the Convention.

Indicator
  • Indicator 2.3.1: Proportion of Parties that are making use of the available tools. For instance, one could look at Google Analytics for the number of site visits to the CITES website, CITES Checklist, or Species+ or the number of downloads from the CITES Trade Database as a proxy for usage of shared tools.
  • Indicator 2.3.2: Percentage of Parties reporting having sufficient information to enforce the Convention.
Objective 2.4 Parties have sufficient information to make listing decisions

Objective 2.4 Parties have sufficient information to make listing decisions that are reflective of species conservation needs.

Indicator
  • Indicator 2.4.1: Percentage of Parties reporting having sufficient information to make listing decisions that are reflective of species conservation needs.
Objective 2.5 Information gaps and needs for key species are identified and addressed

Objective 2.5 Information gaps and needs for key species are identified and addressed.

Indicator
  • Indicator 2.5.1: Number of Parties that have undertaken research (including for non-detriment findings) on their identified key species most relevant to the implementation of the Convention.
  • Indicator 2.5.2: Number of Parties that currently lack information for their identified key species most relevant to the implementation of the Convention and need assistance to address them.
Objective 4.3 Awareness of the role, purpose and achievements of CITES is increased globally

Objective 4.3 Awareness of the role, purpose and achievements of CITES is increased globally.

Indicator
  • Indicator 4.3.1: Number of new, unique visits to the CITES website.
  • Indicator 4.3.2: Number of Parties with information on CITES and its requirements on their official websites.
  • Indicator 4.3.3: Number of followers on CITES social media platforms.
  • Indicator 4.3.4: Number of key identified hashtags (e.g. #cites, #citescop19 #worldwildlifeday, etc.) on CITES social media.
  • Indicator 4.3.5: Number of events submitted to the World Wildlife Day website.
Objective 4.4 CITES Parties are informed of international actions for sustainable development

Objective 4.4 CITES Parties are informed of international actions for sustainable development that may have a bearing on achieving the goal of CITES.

Indicator
  • Indicator 4.4.1: Number of meetings/CoP where representatives of other international bodies report on relevant activities to CITES Parties.
  • Indicator 4.4.2: Events, documents and presentations, etc. delivered by other intergovernmental bodies and fora in meetings convened by the CITES Secretariat.
  • Indicator 4.4.3: Number of Notifications to the Parties issued by the CITES Secretariat relating to international actions for sustainable development that may have a bearing on achieving the goal of CITES.

Mapping with CBD - Aichi Targets

Aichi Target 18

By 2020, the traditional knowledge, innovations and practices of indigenous and local communities relevant for the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity, and their customary use of biological resources, are respected, subject to national legislation and relevant international obligations, and fully integrated and reflected in the implementation of the Convention with the full and effective participation of indigenous and local communities, at all relevant levels.

Aichi Target 19

By 2020, knowledge, the science base and technologies relating to biodiversity, its values, functioning, status and trends, and the consequences of its loss, are improved, widely shared and transferred, and applied.