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TARGET 5. Ensure Sustainable, Safe and Legal Harvesting and Trade of Wild Species

TARGET 5. Ensure Sustainable, Safe and Legal Harvesting and Trade of Wild Species

Ensure that the use, harvesting and trade of wild species is sustainable, safe and legal, preventing overexploitation, minimizing impacts on non-target species and ecosystems, and reducing the risk of pathogen spill-over, applying the ecosystem approach, while respecting and protecting customary sustainable use by indigenous peoples and local communities.

Indicators

Headline indicator:

  • 5.1 Proportion of fish stocks within biologically sustainable levels

Component indicators:

  • Red List Index for used species
  • Living Planet Index for used species
  • Sustainable use of wild species

Complementary indicators:

  • Sustainable watershed and inland fisheries index
  • Red List Index (for internationally traded species and for migratory species)
  • Marine Stewardship Council Fish catch
  • Total catch of cetaceans under the International Convention for the Regulation of Whaling
  • By-catch of vulnerable and non-target species
  • Degree of implementation of international instruments aiming to combat illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing
  • Proportion of legal and illegal wildlife trade consisting of species threatened with extinction
  • Illegal trade by CITES species classification
  • Number of countries incorporating trade in their national biodiversity policy
  • Proportion of terrestrial, freshwater and marine ecological regions which are conserved by protected areas or other effective area-based conservation measures
  • Implementation of measures designed to minimize the impacts of fisheries and hunting on migratory species and their habitats
  • Number of MSC Chain of Custody Certification holders by distribution country
  • Trends of trade and commercialization in biodiversity-based products that is sustainable and legal (in line with BioTrade Principles and/or CITES requirements)

Mapping with Sustainable Development Goals

SDG Target 12.2

By 2030, achieve the sustainable management and efficient use of natural resources

SDG Target 14.4

By 2020, effectively regulate harvesting and end overfishing, illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing and destructive fishing practices and implement science-based management plans, in order to restore fish stocks in the shortest time feasible, at least to levels that can produce maximum sustainable yield as determined by their biological characteristics

SDG Target 14.7

By 2030, increase the economic benefits to small island developing States and least developed countries from the sustainable use of marine resources, including through sustainable management of fisheries, aquaculture and tourism

SDG Target 15.2

By 2020, promote the implementation of sustainable management of all types of forests, halt deforestation, restore degraded forests and substantially increase afforestation and reforestation globally

SDG Target 15.7

Take urgent action to end poaching and trafficking of protected species of flora and fauna and address both demand and supply of illegal wildlife products

SDG Target 15.c

Enhance global support for efforts to combat poaching and trafficking of protected species, including by increasing the capacity of local communities to pursue sustainable livelihood opportunities

Mapping with SAMARKAND STRATEGIC PLAN FOR MIGRATORY SPECIES 2024-2032

Target 3.1. By 2032, any take, use and trade of migratory species listed in CMS Appendices is sustainable, safe and legal, overexploitation is prevented, risk of pathogen spillover is reduced and negative impacts on non-target species and their ecosystems are minimized.

Explanation:Based on the best available knowledge and information, the main drivers of illegal and unsustainable take are identified and analysed for each migratory species to provide a basis for effective conservation and/or management actions, including cooperative actions beyond Range State jurisdictions. Interventions to effectively address the main drivers are undertaken in consultation with relevant stakeholders, indigenous peoples and local communities, and include protection measures for species listed in Appendix I through national legislation, comprehensive and effective enforcement, and management measures to halt illegal and unsustainable take. As a result, there will be no taking of any Appendix I species that is not in compliance with the Convention. Furthermore, steps will be taken towards eliminating any unsustainable take of Appendix II species and non-target CMS-listed migratory species that may also be affected, and towards reducing the risk of pathogen spillover to or from CMS-listed species to prevent the spread of zoonotic diseases. Actions are also taken towards eliminating the incidental mortality such as from bycatch.

Target 5.1. By 2029, Parties have mechanisms in place, including national legislation and enforcement mechanisms where relevant, to fully implement the Convention, its Resolutions and Decisions.

Explanation: Parties can demonstrate that they have national legislation, policies and plans in place that enables them to fully implement the obligations under CMS, especially Articles III and IV. Furthermore, Parties can provide evidence of comprehensive and effective enforcement of the legislation. 

Mapping with 4th Ramsar Strategic Plan 2016-2024

Ramsar Target 5

The ecological character of Ramsar sites is maintained or restored, through effective planning and integrated management.

Baseline
  • At COP12, 973 Ramsar Sites have implemented management plans. (National Reports to COP12).
  • Number of Ramsar Sites that have effective, implemented management plans. (Data source: new National Report question).
  • 27% of Parties have made assessments of effective management of Ramsar sites. (National Reports to COP12).
  • 43% (950 of Ramsar Sites have updated Ramsar Information Sheets. (Report of the Secretary General pursuant to Article 8.2 COP12 Doc.7).
Indicator
  • Number of Ramsar Sites that have effective, implemented management plans. (Data source: National Report).
  • Number of Ramsar Sites that have effective, implemented management planning. (Data source: new National Report question).
  • % of Parties that have made assessments of effective management of Ramsar Sites. (Data source: National Reports).
  • % of Ramsar Sites that have updated Ramsar Information Sheets. (Data source: Ramsar Sites database).

Possible further indicators that may be developed

  • {Coverage of wetland dependent bird populations by designated Ramsar Sites. Indicator from Resolution IX.1 to be developed}.
  • {Coverage of wetland dependent non-avian populations by designated Ramsar Sites. Indicator from Resolution IX.1 to be developed}.
  • {% loss of IUCN Red Listed species from Ramsar Sites}

Mapping with CITES Strategic Vision: 2021-2030

Objective 1.1 Parties comply with their obligations under the Convention

 Objective 1.1 Parties comply with their obligations under the Convention through the adoption and implementation of appropriate legislation, policies, and procedures.

Indicator
  • Indicator 1.1.1: Number of Parties that are in category 1 under the national legislation project.
  • Indicator 1.1.2: Number of Parties subject to CITES recommendations to suspend trade.
Objective 1.3 Implementation of the Convention at the national level is consistent with Resolutions and Decisions adopted by the CoP

Objective 1.3 Implementation of the Convention at the national level is consistent with Resolutions and Decisions adopted by the Conference of the Parties.

Indicator
  • Indicator 1.3.1: Number of Parties that have implemented relevant reporting under Resolutions and Decisions of the Conference of the Parties and/or Standing Committee recommendations.
Objective 1.4 The Appendices correctly reflect the conservation status and needs of species

Objective 1.4 The Appendices correctly reflect the conservation status and needs of species.

Objective 1.5 Parties improve the conservation status of CITES-listed specimens

Objective 1.5 Parties improve the conservation status of CITES-listed specimens, put in place national conservation actions, support their sustainable use and promote cooperation in managing shared wildlife resources.

Indicator
  • Indicator 1.5.1: The conservation status of species listed on the CITES Appendices has stabilized or improved.
  • Indicator 1.5.2: Number of CITES-listed species for which Parties have put in place actions that support sustainable use

Mapping with CBD - Aichi Targets

Aichi Target 6

By 2020 all fish and invertebrate stocks and aquatic plants are managed and harvested sustainably, legally and applying ecosystem based approaches, so that overfishing is avoided, recovery plans and measures are in place for all depleted species, fisheries have no significant adverse impacts on threatened species and vulnerable ecosystems and the impacts of fisheries on stocks, species and ecosystems are within safe ecological limits.

Mapping with Strategic Framework for the International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC) 2020–2030

Strategic objective C: Facilitate safe trade, development and economic growth
Rational

Trade in plants and plant products is a critically important part of most national economies. It is evident that earnings from this trade stimulate economic growth and brings well-being and prosperity to rural communities and agricultural sectors. The main potential pathway for the global spread of pests is through international trade, so the IPPC aims to maximize the benefits of trade by enabling countries to reduce the risk of international pest spread through the application of harmonized phytosanitary standards. IPPC standards help countries to develop import and export systems that manage the pest risks associated with trade in plants and plant products. When properly implemented, trade can occur safely (i.e. without spreading plant pests).

Key result C1: Commodity-specific standards with harmonized phytosanitary measures have facilitated and simplified safe trade in plant products.

C1: Commodity-specific standards with harmonized phytosanitary measures have facilitated and accelerated trade negotiations and simplified safe trade in plant products.

Key result C2: Detections of pests in trade pathways are declining

C2: Detections of pests in trade pathways are declining as exporting countries take more responsibility for managing the pest risk associated with exports, and importing countries report detections more quickly and more consistently.

Key result C3: NPPOs have built capacity and been supported to establish phytosanitary export assurance and phytosanitary certification systems

C3: NPPOs have built capacity and been supported to establish phytosanitary export assurance and phytosanitary certification systems that are robust and are trusted by trading partners.

Key result C4: The efficiency of administering phytosanitary certification systems has improved

C4: The efficiency of administering phytosanitary certification systems has improved and the circulation of fraudulent certificates has been eliminated through electronic phytosanitary certification systems including the generic ePhyto national system and the global ePhyto hub.

Key result C5: NPPOs have access to expert advice to enable resolution of bilateral trade concerns of a phytosanitary nature

C5: NPPOs have access to expert advice to enable resolution of bilateral trade concerns of a phytosanitary nature.

Key result C6: NPPOs are able to meet regularly to deliberate on phytosanitary research and emerging issues

C6: NPPOs are able to meet regularly to deliberate on phytosanitary research and emerging issues and other matters of common interest.

Key result C7: Contracting parties have legislation in place to enable implementation of ePhyto

Key result C7: Contracting parties have legislation in place to enable implementation of ePhyto.