Up one level

TARGET 10. Enhance Biodiversity and Sustainability in Agriculture, Aquaculture, Fisheries, and Forestry

TARGET 10. Enhance Biodiversity and Sustainability in Agriculture, Aquaculture, Fisheries, and Forestry

Ensure that areas under agriculture, aquaculture, fisheries and forestry are managed sustainably, in particular through the sustainable use of biodiversity, including through a substantial increase of the application of biodiversity friendly practices, such as sustainable intensification, agroecological and other innovative approaches contributing to the resilience and long-term efficiency and productivity of these production systems and to food security, conserving and restoring biodiversity and maintaining nature’s contributions to people, including ecosystem functions and services.

Indicators

Headline indicators:

  • 10.1 Proportion of agricultural area under productive and sustainable agriculture
  • 10.2 Progress towards sustainable forest management

Component indicators:

  • Area of forest under sustainable management: total forest management certification by the Forest Stewardship Council and the Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification
  • Average income of small-scale food producers, by sex and indigenous status

Complementary indicators:

  • Agrobiodiversity Index
  • Changes in soil organic carbon stocks
  • Red List Index (wild relatives of domesticated animals)
  • Red List Index (pollinating species)
  • Proportion of local breeds classified as being at risk of extinction
  • Proportion of land that is degraded over total land area

Mapping with SECOND GLOBAL PLAN OF ACTION FOR PLANT GENETIC RESOURCES FOR FOOD AND AGRICULTURE

Mapping with The UNCCD 2018–2030 Strategic Framework

Strategic objective 1: Affected ecosystems

To improve the condition of affected ecosystems, combat desertification/land degradation, promote sustainable land management and contribute to land degradation neutrality

Indicators

UNCCD indicators:

  • SO 1-1 Trends in land cover
  • SO 1-2 Trends in land productivity or functioning of the land
  • SO 1-3 Trends in carbon stocks above and below ground
  • SO 1-4 Proportion of land that is degraded over total land area

SDG indicators:

  • 15.3.1 Proportion of land that is degraded over total land area

CBD indicators:

  • A.2 Extent of natural ecosystems
  • 2.2 Area under restoration 
  • Extent of natural ecosystems by type (Component indicator under target 2)
  • Proportion of total land area that is under cultivation (Complementary indicator under target 1)
  • Above-ground biomass stock in forests (tonnes/ha)  (Complementary indicator under target 8)
  • Changes in soil organic carbon stocks (Complementary indicator under target 10)
  • Proportion of land that is degraded over total land area (Complementary indicator under target 10)

 

Mapping with Sustainable Development Goals

SDG Target 2.3

By 2030, double the agricultural productivity and incomes of small-scale food producers, in particular women, indigenous peoples, family farmers, pastoralists and fishers, including through secure and equal access to land, other productive resources and inputs, knowledge, financial services, markets and opportunities for value addition and non-farm employment

SDG Target 2.4

By 2030, ensure sustainable food production systems and implement resilient agricultural practices that increase productivity and production, that help maintain ecosystems, that strengthen capacity for adaptation to climate change, extreme weather, drought, flooding and other disasters and that progressively improve land and soil quality

SDG Target 12.1

Implement the 10‑Year Framework of Programmes on Sustainable Consumption and Production Patterns, all countries taking action, with developed countries taking the lead, taking into account the development and capabilities of developing countries

SDG Target 12.2

By 2030, achieve the sustainable management and efficient use of natural resources

SDG Target 14.7

By 2030, increase the economic benefits to small island developing States and least developed countries from the sustainable use of marine resources, including through sustainable management of fisheries, aquaculture and tourism

SDG Target 15.2

By 2020, promote the implementation of sustainable management of all types of forests, halt deforestation, restore degraded forests and substantially increase afforestation and reforestation globally

Mapping with SAMARKAND STRATEGIC PLAN FOR MIGRATORY SPECIES 2024-2032

Target 2.3. By 2032, the loss, degradation and fragmentation of important habitats for migratory species listed in CMS Appendices is reduced, and habitats are restored to ensure that such habitats support their viability.

Explanation: Steps will be taken towards eliminating and/or reducing the negative impacts on migratory species from the loss and degradation of important habitats and ranges because of land-use change and fragmentation. This includes tackling known threats such as unsustainable intensive agriculture, damaging afforestation, urbanization or human-made infrastructure. 

Mapping with 4th Ramsar Strategic Plan 2016-2024

Ramsar Target 2

Water use respects wetland ecosystem needs for them to fulfil their functions and provide services at the appropriate scale inter alia at the basin level or along a coastal zone.

Baseline

70% of Parties have included wetland issues into national strategies and planning processes such as water resource management and water efficiency plans. (National Reports to COP12).

Indicator
  • % of Parties that have included wetland issues into national strategies and in the planning processes such as for water resource management and water efficiency plans. (Data source: National Reports).

Possible further indicators that may be developed:

  • {% of Ramsar sites which have improved the sustainability of water use in the context of ecosystem requirements}
Ramsar Target 3

The public and private sectors have increased their efforts to apply guidelines and good practices for the wise use of water and wetlands.

Baseline
  • 50% of Parties report actions taken to implement incentive measures that encourage the conservation and wise use of wetlands. (National Reports to COP12).
  • 37% of Parties report actions taken to remove perverse incentive measures that discourage conservation and wise use of wetlands. (National Reports to COP12).
  • 60% of Parties report private sector undertaking activities for the conservation, wise use and management of wetlands in general. (National Reports to COP12).
  • % of Parties have national Ramsar Committees that include both governmental and non-governmental representation. (Data source: new question for National Reports).
Indicator
  • % of Parties reporting actions taken to implement incentive measures that encourage the conservation and wise use of wetlands. (Data source: National Reports).
  • % of Parties reporting actions taken to remove perverse incentive measures that discourage conservation and wise use of wetlands. (Data source: National Reports).
  • % of Parties reporting private sector undertaking activities for the conservation, wise use and management of wetlands in general. (Data source: National Reports).
  • % of Parties having national Ramsar Committees that include both governmental and non-governmental representation. (Data source: new question for National Reports).
Ramsar Target 7

Sites that are at risk of change of ecological character have threats addressed.

Baseline
  • At COP12, [47] Ramsar Sites (2.2%) are listed on the Montreux Record. (Report of the Secretary General pursuant to Article 8.2 COP12 Doc.7).
  • 21% of Parties have reported to the Ramsar Secretariat all cases of negative human- induced change or likely change in the ecological character of Ramsar sites pursuant to Article 3.2. (National Reports to COP12).
  • [76] Ramsar Sites reported by Parties to the Ramsar Secretariat of negative human-induced change or likely change in the ecological character of Ramsar Sites pursuant to Article 3.2. (Data source: Report of the Secretary General pursuant to Article 8.2 COP12 Doc.7).
  • 16% of Parties have taken actions to address the issues for which Ramsar sites have been listed on the Montreux Record. (National Reports to COP12).
Indicator
  • Number of Ramsar Sites removed from the Montreux Record. (Data source: Ramsar Site database).
  • % of Parties reporting to the Ramsar Secretariat all cases of negative human-induced change or likely change in the ecological character of Ramsar Sites pursuant to Article 3.2. (Data source: National Reports).
  • Number of Ramsar Sites reported by Parties to the Ramsar Secretariat of negative human-induced change or likely change in the ecological character of Ramsar Sites pursuant to Article 3.2. (Data source: National Reports).
  • % of Parties that have taken actions to address the issues for which Ramsar Sites have been listed on the Montreux Record. (National Reports to COP12).

Possible further indicators that may be developed

  • {Indicator(s) relating to (numbers of) Ramsar Sites at risk}
Ramsar Target 9

The wise use of wetlands is strengthened through integrated resource management at the appropriate scale, inter alia, within a river basin or along a coastal zone.

Baseline
  • 55% of Parties have adopted wetland policies or equivalent instruments that promote the wise use of their wetlands. (National Reports to COP12).
  • 71% of Parties consider wetlands as natural water infrastructure integral to water resource management at the scale of river basin. (National Reports to COP12).
Indicator
  • % of Parties that have adopted wetland policies or equivalent instruments that promote the wise use of their wetlands. (Data source: National Reports).
  • % of Parties that consider wetlands as natural water infrastructure integral to water resource management at the scale of river basin. (Data source: National Reports).

Possible further indicators that may be developed

  • {Involvement of stakeholders in various aspects of wetland and/or basin-scale management}
Ramsar Target 13

Enhanced sustainability of key sectors such as water, energy, mining, agriculture, tourism, urban development, infrastructure, industry, forestry, aquaculture and fisheries, when they affect wetlands, contributing to biodiversity conservation and human livelihoods.

Baseline

-

Indicator

Possible further indicators that may be developed

  • {Indicators related to the relevant sectors especially using or linking to relevant Aichi Target indicators and other relevant international processes}.

Mapping with CITES Strategic Vision: 2021-2030

Objective 1.1 Parties comply with their obligations under the Convention

 Objective 1.1 Parties comply with their obligations under the Convention through the adoption and implementation of appropriate legislation, policies, and procedures.

Indicator
  • Indicator 1.1.1: Number of Parties that are in category 1 under the national legislation project.
  • Indicator 1.1.2: Number of Parties subject to CITES recommendations to suspend trade.
Objective 1.3 Implementation of the Convention at the national level is consistent with Resolutions and Decisions adopted by the CoP

Objective 1.3 Implementation of the Convention at the national level is consistent with Resolutions and Decisions adopted by the Conference of the Parties.

Indicator
  • Indicator 1.3.1: Number of Parties that have implemented relevant reporting under Resolutions and Decisions of the Conference of the Parties and/or Standing Committee recommendations.
Objective 1.5 Parties improve the conservation status of CITES-listed specimens

Objective 1.5 Parties improve the conservation status of CITES-listed specimens, put in place national conservation actions, support their sustainable use and promote cooperation in managing shared wildlife resources.

Indicator
  • Indicator 1.5.1: The conservation status of species listed on the CITES Appendices has stabilized or improved.
  • Indicator 1.5.2: Number of CITES-listed species for which Parties have put in place actions that support sustainable use

Mapping with CBD - Aichi Targets

Aichi Target 6

By 2020 all fish and invertebrate stocks and aquatic plants are managed and harvested sustainably, legally and applying ecosystem based approaches, so that overfishing is avoided, recovery plans and measures are in place for all depleted species, fisheries have no significant adverse impacts on threatened species and vulnerable ecosystems and the impacts of fisheries on stocks, species and ecosystems are within safe ecological limits.

Aichi Target 7

By 2020 areas under agriculture, aquaculture and forestry are managed sustainably, ensuring conservation of biodiversity.

Mapping with Strategic Framework for the International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC) 2020–2030

Strategic objective A: Enhance global food security and increase sustainable agricultural productivity
Rational

This aims to reduce the international spread of pests, as the losses caused by the spread of a new pest into new areas or crops can be much more catastrophic than endemic pests in a given area. The impact of plant pests on food security is particularly evident in the developing world, where plant health regulatory frameworks often lack capacity. If the spread of pests is reduced and pest management is improved, crop productivity can increase and production costs can be reduced.

Key result A1: All NPPOs have effective pest surveillance systems in place

2030 key result area A1:

All NPPOs have effective pest surveillance systems in place for timely detection of new pest arrivals and monitoring spread.

Key result A2: All NPPOs have strong capacities to monitor, detect, diagnose, report, and prepare rapid responses to pest outbreaks

All NPPOs have strong capacities to monitor, detect, diagnose, report, and prepare rapid responses to pest outbreaks, so that these pests do not have major impacts on food supplies and they do not spread and thereby threaten other regions and trading partners.

Key result A3: A plant health emergency response system is in place

A3: A plant health emergency response system is in place that facilitates timely action against new pest incursions and supports countries with emergency response systems tools and knowledge.

Key result A4: Sustainable pest risk management options are implemented widely

A4: Sustainable pest risk management options, such as systems approaches, are implemented widely to minimize pest impacts right through the production process and harvesting, and to minimize the need for end-point treatments.

Key result A5: All NPPOs have pest risk analysis capacity in place

A5: All NPPOs have pest risk analysis capacity in place to identify and mitigate pest risks to crop production.

Key result A6: Pest risk prevention is integrated throughout the production, processing and trade chain

A6: Pest risk prevention is integrated throughout the production, processing and trade chain of plants and plant products.