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TARGET 9. Manage Wild Species Sustainably To Benefit People

TARGET 9. Manage Wild Species Sustainably To Benefit People

Ensure that the management and use of wild species are sustainable, thereby providing social, economic and environmental benefits for people, especially those in vulnerable situations and those most dependent on biodiversity, including through sustainable biodiversity-based activities, products and services that enhance biodiversity, and protecting and encouraging customary sustainable use by indigenous peoples and local communities.

Headline indicator
  • 9.1 Benefits from the sustainable use of wild species
  • 9.2 Percentage of the population in traditional occupations
Component indicator
  • Number of people using wild resources for energy, food or culture (including firewood collection, hunting and fishing, gathering, medicinal use, craft making, etc.)
  • Red List Index (species used for food and medicine)
  • Living Planet Index for used species
Complementary indicator
  • Proportion of fish stocks within biologically sustainable levels
  • Degree of implementation of international instruments aiming to combat illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing
  • Number of MSC Chain of Custody Certification holders by distribution country
  • Spawning stock biomass (related to commercially exploited species)
  • Number of plant and animal genetic resources for food and agriculture secured in medium- or long-term conservation facilities
  • Volume of production per labour unit by classes of farming/pastoral/ forestry enterprise size

Mapping with Sustainable Development Goals

SDG Target 12.2

By 2030, achieve the sustainable management and efficient use of natural resources

SDG Target 14.7

By 2030, increase the economic benefits to small island developing States and least developed countries from the sustainable use of marine resources, including through sustainable management of fisheries, aquaculture and tourism

SDG Target 15.7

Take urgent action to end poaching and trafficking of protected species of flora and fauna and address both demand and supply of illegal wildlife products

Mapping with SAMARKAND STRATEGIC PLAN FOR MIGRATORY SPECIES 2024-2032

Target 1.2. By 2029, the conservation status of all migratory species is reviewed regularly, informing priorities for conservation and management action.

Explanation: The conservation status, population trend, range and extinction risk of all migratory species is regularly monitored, including through the State of the World’s Migratory Species report, CMS National Reports,[1] other assessments and analyses of relevant publications such as those produced by CMS and its Instruments, and information from relevant stakeholders, indigenous peoples and local communities. The conclusions of this regular monitoring supports priority-setting under CMS, including the listing of new migratory species that may need specific conservation actions.
 

[1] IUCN Red List assessments are the primary source for assessing the conservation status of migratory species. CMS National Reports and EU N2000 reports etc. could also provide additional information if available..

Mapping with 4th Ramsar Strategic Plan 2016-2024

Ramsar Target 9

The wise use of wetlands is strengthened through integrated resource management at the appropriate scale, inter alia, within a river basin or along a coastal zone.

Baseline
  • 55% of Parties have adopted wetland policies or equivalent instruments that promote the wise use of their wetlands. (National Reports to COP12).
  • 71% of Parties consider wetlands as natural water infrastructure integral to water resource management at the scale of river basin. (National Reports to COP12).
Indicator
  • % of Parties that have adopted wetland policies or equivalent instruments that promote the wise use of their wetlands. (Data source: National Reports).
  • % of Parties that consider wetlands as natural water infrastructure integral to water resource management at the scale of river basin. (Data source: National Reports).

Possible further indicators that may be developed

  • {Involvement of stakeholders in various aspects of wetland and/or basin-scale management}

Mapping with CITES Strategic Vision: 2021-2030

Objective 1.1 Parties comply with their obligations under the Convention

 Objective 1.1 Parties comply with their obligations under the Convention through the adoption and implementation of appropriate legislation, policies, and procedures.

Indicator
  • Indicator 1.1.1: Number of Parties that are in category 1 under the national legislation project.
  • Indicator 1.1.2: Number of Parties subject to CITES recommendations to suspend trade.
Objective 1.3 Implementation of the Convention at the national level is consistent with Resolutions and Decisions adopted by the CoP

Objective 1.3 Implementation of the Convention at the national level is consistent with Resolutions and Decisions adopted by the Conference of the Parties.

Indicator
  • Indicator 1.3.1: Number of Parties that have implemented relevant reporting under Resolutions and Decisions of the Conference of the Parties and/or Standing Committee recommendations.
Objective 1.4 The Appendices correctly reflect the conservation status and needs of species

Objective 1.4 The Appendices correctly reflect the conservation status and needs of species.

Objective 1.5 Parties improve the conservation status of CITES-listed specimens

Objective 1.5 Parties improve the conservation status of CITES-listed specimens, put in place national conservation actions, support their sustainable use and promote cooperation in managing shared wildlife resources.

Indicator
  • Indicator 1.5.1: The conservation status of species listed on the CITES Appendices has stabilized or improved.
  • Indicator 1.5.2: Number of CITES-listed species for which Parties have put in place actions that support sustainable use

Mapping with CBD - Aichi Targets

Aichi Target 6

By 2020 all fish and invertebrate stocks and aquatic plants are managed and harvested sustainably, legally and applying ecosystem based approaches, so that overfishing is avoided, recovery plans and measures are in place for all depleted species, fisheries have no significant adverse impacts on threatened species and vulnerable ecosystems and the impacts of fisheries on stocks, species and ecosystems are within safe ecological limits.