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SDG Target 15.2

SDG Target 15.2

By 2020, promote the implementation of sustainable management of all types of forests, halt deforestation, restore degraded forests and substantially increase afforestation and reforestation globally

Mapping with Kunming-Montreal Global Biodiversity Framework

TARGET 1. Plan and Manage all Areas To Reduce Biodiversity Loss

Ensure that all areas are under participatory integrated biodiversity inclusive spatial planning and/or effective management processes addressing land and sea use change, to bring the loss of areas of high biodiversity importance, including ecosystems of high ecological integrity, close to zero by 2030, while respecting the rights of indigenous peoples and local communities.

Headline Indicator
  • A.1 Red List of Ecosystems
  • A.2 Extent of natural ecosystems
  • 1.1 Percent of land and sea area covered by biodiversity-inclusive spatial plans*
 
 Component indicator
  • Priority retention of intact / wilderness areas
 Complementary indicators
  • Number of countries using natural capital accounts in planning processes
  • Percentage of spatial plans utilizing information on key biodiversity areas
  • Habitat patches located within marine protected areas or integrated coastal zone management (ICZM)
  • Other spatial management plans (not captured as ICZM or marine spatial planning)
  • Number of countries using ocean accounts in planning processes
  • Proportion of transboundary basin area with an operational arrangement for water cooperation
  • Percent of total land area that is under cultivation
  • Extent of natural ecosystems by type Number of countries implementing national legislation, policies or other measures regarding FPIC related to conservation
  • Ecosystem Integrity Index

 

TARGET 5. Ensure Sustainable, Safe and Legal Harvesting and Trade of Wild Species

Ensure that the use, harvesting and trade of wild species is sustainable, safe and legal, preventing overexploitation, minimizing impacts on non-target species and ecosystems, and reducing the risk of pathogen spill-over, applying the ecosystem approach, while respecting and protecting customary sustainable use by indigenous peoples and local communities.

Headline indicator
  • 5.1 Proportion of fish stocks within biologically sustainable levels
Component indicator
  • Red List Index for used species
  • Living Planet Index for used species
  • Sustainable use of wild species
Complementary indicator
  • Sustainable watershed and inland fisheries index
  • Red List Index (for internationally traded species and for migratory species)
  • Marine Stewardship Council Fish catch
  • Total catch of cetaceans under the International Convention for the Regulation of Whaling
  • By-catch of vulnerable and non-target species
  • Degree of implementation of international instruments aiming to combat illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing
  • Proportion of legal and illegal wildlife trade consisting of species threatened with extinction
  • Illegal trade by CITES species classification
  • Number of countries incorporating trade in their national biodiversity policy
  • Proportion of terrestrial, freshwater and marine ecological regions which are conserved by protected areas or other effective area-based conservation measures
  • Implementation of measures designed to minimize the impacts of fisheries and hunting on migratory species and their habitats
  • Number of MSC Chain of Custody Certification holders by distribution country
  • Trends of trade and commercialization in biodiversity-based products that is sustainable and legal (in line with BioTrade Principles and/or CITES requirements)

 

TARGET 10. Enhance Biodiversity and Sustainability in Agriculture, Aquaculture, Fisheries, and Forestry

Ensure that areas under agriculture, aquaculture, fisheries and forestry are managed sustainably, in particular through the sustainable use of biodiversity, including through a substantial increase of the application of biodiversity friendly practices, such as sustainable intensification, agroecological and other innovative approaches contributing to the resilience and long-term efficiency and productivity of these production systems and to food security, conserving and restoring biodiversity and maintaining nature’s contributions to people, including ecosystem functions and services.

Headline indicator
  • 10.1 Proportion of agricultural area under productive and sustainable agriculture
  • 10.2 Progress towards sustainable forest management
Component indicator
  • Area of forest under sustainable management: total forest management certification by the Forest Stewardship Council and the Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification
  • Average income of small-scale food producers, by sex and indigenous status
Complementary indicator
  • Agrobiodiversity Index
  • Changes in soil organic carbon stocks
  • Red List Index (wild relatives of domesticated animals)
  • Red List Index (pollinating species)
  • Proportion of local breeds classified as being at risk of extinction
  • Proportion of land that is degraded over total land area

Mapping with 4th Ramsar Strategic Plan 2016-2024

Ramsar Target 3

The public and private sectors have increased their efforts to apply guidelines and good practices for the wise use of water and wetlands.

Baseline
  • 50% of Parties report actions taken to implement incentive measures that encourage the conservation and wise use of wetlands. (National Reports to COP12).
  • 37% of Parties report actions taken to remove perverse incentive measures that discourage conservation and wise use of wetlands. (National Reports to COP12).
  • 60% of Parties report private sector undertaking activities for the conservation, wise use and management of wetlands in general. (National Reports to COP12).
  • % of Parties have national Ramsar Committees that include both governmental and non-governmental representation. (Data source: new question for National Reports).
Indicator
  • % of Parties reporting actions taken to implement incentive measures that encourage the conservation and wise use of wetlands. (Data source: National Reports).
  • % of Parties reporting actions taken to remove perverse incentive measures that discourage conservation and wise use of wetlands. (Data source: National Reports).
  • % of Parties reporting private sector undertaking activities for the conservation, wise use and management of wetlands in general. (Data source: National Reports).
  • % of Parties having national Ramsar Committees that include both governmental and non-governmental representation. (Data source: new question for National Reports).
Ramsar Target 5

The ecological character of Ramsar sites is maintained or restored, through effective planning and integrated management.

Baseline
  • At COP12, 973 Ramsar Sites have implemented management plans. (National Reports to COP12).
  • Number of Ramsar Sites that have effective, implemented management plans. (Data source: new National Report question).
  • 27% of Parties have made assessments of effective management of Ramsar sites. (National Reports to COP12).
  • 43% (950 of Ramsar Sites have updated Ramsar Information Sheets. (Report of the Secretary General pursuant to Article 8.2 COP12 Doc.7).
Indicator
  • Number of Ramsar Sites that have effective, implemented management plans. (Data source: National Report).
  • Number of Ramsar Sites that have effective, implemented management planning. (Data source: new National Report question).
  • % of Parties that have made assessments of effective management of Ramsar Sites. (Data source: National Reports).
  • % of Ramsar Sites that have updated Ramsar Information Sheets. (Data source: Ramsar Sites database).

Possible further indicators that may be developed

  • {Coverage of wetland dependent bird populations by designated Ramsar Sites. Indicator from Resolution IX.1 to be developed}.
  • {Coverage of wetland dependent non-avian populations by designated Ramsar Sites. Indicator from Resolution IX.1 to be developed}.
  • {% loss of IUCN Red Listed species from Ramsar Sites}
Ramsar Target 6

There is a significant increase in area, numbers and ecological connectivity in the Ramsar Site network, in particular under-represented types of wetlands including in under-represented ecoregions and Transboundary Sites.

Baseline
  • By COP12, 2,186 Ramsar Sites have been designated. (Ramsar Sites database).
  • By COP12 2,085,000 ha of Ramsar Sites have been designated. (Ramsar Sites database).
  • By COP12 [16] transboundary Ramsar Sites have been designated. (Ramsar Secretariat).
  • By COP12, Ramsar Sites have been designated for the following under-represented Ramsar Sites:
    • Karst and other subterranean hydrological systems – [110 Sites]
    • Coral reefs – [96 Sites]
    • Wet grasslands – [517 Sites]
    • Peatlands – [564 Sites]
    • Sea-grass beds – [249 Sites]
    • Mangroves – [280 Sites]
    • Temporary Pools – [729 Sites]
    • Bivalve (shellfish) reefs – [99 Sites]
    • (Ramsar Sites database, June 2015).
Indicator
  • Number of Ramsar sites that have been designated. (Data source: Ramsar Sites database).
  • Total hectares of Ramsar sites that have been designated. (Data source: Ramsar Sites database).
  • Number of transboundary Ramsar Sites that have been designated. (Data source: Ramsar Sites database).
  • Number of Ramsar Sites designated for the following underrepresented wetland types:
    • Karst and other subterranean hydrological systems – [XXX Sites]
    • Coral reefs – [XXX Sites]
    • Wet grasslands – [XXX Sites]
    • Peatlands – [XXX Sites]
    • Sea-grass beds – [XXX Sites]
    • Mangroves – [XXX Sites] T
    • emporary Pools – [XXX Sites]
    • Bivalve (shellfish) reefs – [XXX Sites]
    • (Data source: Ramsar Sites database).
Ramsar Target 7

Sites that are at risk of change of ecological character have threats addressed.

Baseline
  • At COP12, [47] Ramsar Sites (2.2%) are listed on the Montreux Record. (Report of the Secretary General pursuant to Article 8.2 COP12 Doc.7).
  • 21% of Parties have reported to the Ramsar Secretariat all cases of negative human- induced change or likely change in the ecological character of Ramsar sites pursuant to Article 3.2. (National Reports to COP12).
  • [76] Ramsar Sites reported by Parties to the Ramsar Secretariat of negative human-induced change or likely change in the ecological character of Ramsar Sites pursuant to Article 3.2. (Data source: Report of the Secretary General pursuant to Article 8.2 COP12 Doc.7).
  • 16% of Parties have taken actions to address the issues for which Ramsar sites have been listed on the Montreux Record. (National Reports to COP12).
Indicator
  • Number of Ramsar Sites removed from the Montreux Record. (Data source: Ramsar Site database).
  • % of Parties reporting to the Ramsar Secretariat all cases of negative human-induced change or likely change in the ecological character of Ramsar Sites pursuant to Article 3.2. (Data source: National Reports).
  • Number of Ramsar Sites reported by Parties to the Ramsar Secretariat of negative human-induced change or likely change in the ecological character of Ramsar Sites pursuant to Article 3.2. (Data source: National Reports).
  • % of Parties that have taken actions to address the issues for which Ramsar Sites have been listed on the Montreux Record. (National Reports to COP12).

Possible further indicators that may be developed

  • {Indicator(s) relating to (numbers of) Ramsar Sites at risk}
Ramsar Target 12

Restoration is in progress in degraded wetlands, with priority to wetlands that are relevant for biodiversity conservation, disaster risk reduction, livelihoods and/or climate change mitigation and adaptation.

Baseline
  • 68% of Parties have identified priority sites for restoration. (National Reports to COP12).
  • 70% of Parties have implemented restoration or rehabilitation programmes. (National Reports to COP12).
Indicator
  • % of Parties that have established restoration plans [or activities] for sites. (Data source: National Reports).
  • % of Parties that have implemented effective restoration or rehabilitation projects. (Data source: National Reports).

Possible further indicators that may be developed

  • {Outcome-based indicators(s) related to (extent of) wetland restoration possibly including remote sensing as appropriate}.

Mapping with CITES Strategic Vision: 2021-2030

Objective 1.1 Parties comply with their obligations under the Convention

 Objective 1.1 Parties comply with their obligations under the Convention through the adoption and implementation of appropriate legislation, policies, and procedures.

Indicator
  • Indicator 1.1.1: Number of Parties that are in category 1 under the national legislation project.
  • Indicator 1.1.2: Number of Parties subject to CITES recommendations to suspend trade.
Objective 1.3 Implementation of the Convention at the national level is consistent with Resolutions and Decisions adopted by the CoP

Objective 1.3 Implementation of the Convention at the national level is consistent with Resolutions and Decisions adopted by the Conference of the Parties.

Indicator
  • Indicator 1.3.1: Number of Parties that have implemented relevant reporting under Resolutions and Decisions of the Conference of the Parties and/or Standing Committee recommendations.
Objective 1.5 Parties improve the conservation status of CITES-listed specimens

Objective 1.5 Parties improve the conservation status of CITES-listed specimens, put in place national conservation actions, support their sustainable use and promote cooperation in managing shared wildlife resources.

Indicator
  • Indicator 1.5.1: The conservation status of species listed on the CITES Appendices has stabilized or improved.
  • Indicator 1.5.2: Number of CITES-listed species for which Parties have put in place actions that support sustainable use
Objective 2.1 Parties’ non-detriment findings are based on best available scientific information

 Objective 2.1 Parties’ non-detriment findings are based on best available scientific information and their determination of legal acquisition is based on the best available technical and legal information.

Indicator
  • Indicator 2.1.1: Number of Parties that have adopted standard procedures for making non-detriment findings (NDFs).
  • Indicator 2.1.2: Number of written NDFs submitted and number of Parties submitting NDFs for posting in the CITES online database.
  • Indicator 2.1.3: Number of Parties that have included the legal acquisition finding obligation in their national regulatory framework, as recommended by Resolution Conf. 18.7 (Rev. CoP19).
Objective 4.1 Parties support sustainable wildlife trade policies

Objective 4.1 Parties support sustainable wildlife trade policies, especially those that increase the capacity of Indigenous peoples and local communities to pursue livelihoods.

Indicator
  • Indicator 4.1.1: Number of CITES-listed species for which Parties have designed/implemented relevant sustainable wildlife management policies.
  • Indicator 4.1.2: Percentage of Parties that co-developed or otherwise supported the capacity of indigenous peoples and local communities to pursue livelihoods.

 

Mapping with CBD - Aichi Targets

Aichi Target 4

By 2020, at the latest, Governments, business and stakeholders at all levels have taken steps to achieve or have implemented plans for sustainable production and consumption and have kept the impacts of use of natural resources well within safe ecological limits.

Aichi Target 5

By 2020, the rate of loss of all natural habitats, including forests, is at least halved and where feasible brought close to zero, and degradation and fragmentation is significantly reduced.

Aichi Target 7

By 2020 areas under agriculture, aquaculture and forestry are managed sustainably, ensuring conservation of biodiversity.

Aichi Target 12

By 2020 the extinction of known threatened species has been prevented and their conservation status, particularly of those most in decline, has been improved and sustained.

Aichi Target 14

By 2020, ecosystems that provide essential services, including services related to water, and contribute to health, livelihoods and well-being, are restored and safeguarded, taking into account the needs of women, indigenous and local communities, and the poor and vulnerable.

Aichi Target 15

By 2020, ecosystem resilience and the contribution of biodiversity to carbon stocks has been enhanced, through conservation and restoration, including restoration of at least 15 per cent of degraded ecosystems, thereby contributing to climate change mitigation and adaptation and to combating desertification.