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SDG Target 15.6

SDG Target 15.6

Promote fair and equitable sharing of the benefits arising from the utilization of genetic resources and promote appropriate access to such resources, as internationally agreed

Mapping with Kunming-Montreal Global Biodiversity Framework

TARGET 13. Increase the Sharing of Benefits From Genetic Resources, Digital Sequence Information and Traditional Knowledge

Take effective legal, policy, administrative and capacity-building measures at all levels, as appropriate, to ensure the fair and equitable sharing of benefits that arise from the utilization of genetic resources and from digital sequence information on genetic resources, as well as traditional knowledge associated with genetic resources, and facilitating appropriate access to genetic resources, and by 2030 facilitating a significant increase of the benefits shared, in accordance with applicable international access and benefit-sharing instruments.

Indicators

Headline indicators:

  • C.1 Indicator on monetary benefits received
  • C.2 Indicator on non-monetary benefits

Component indicator:

  • Number of permits or their equivalents for genetic resources (including those related to traditional knowledge) by type of permit

Complementary indicators:

  • Total number of transfers of crop material from the Multilateral System of the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture (ITPGRFA) received in a country
  • Total number of permits, or their equivalent, granted for access to genetic resources
  • Total number of internationally recognized certificates of compliance published in the ABS Clearing-House
  • Number of countries that require prior informed consent that have published legislative, administrative or policy measures on access and benefit-sharing in the ABS Clearing-House
  • Number of countries that require prior informed consent that have published information on access and benefit-sharing procedures in the ABS Clearing-House
  • Number of countries that have adopted legislative, administrative and policy frameworks to ensure fair and equitable sharing of benefits
  • Estimated percentage of monetary and non-monetary benefits directed towards conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity
TARGET 19. Mobilize $200 Billion per Year for Biodiversity From all Sources, Including $30 Billion Through International Finance

Substantially and progressively increase the level of financial resources from all sources, in an effective, timely and easily accessible manner, including domestic, international, public and private resources, in accordance with Article 20 of the Convention, to implement national biodiversity strategies and action plans, by 2030 mobilizing at least 200 billion United States dollars per year, including by:

(a) Increasing total biodiversity related international financial resources from developed countries, including official development assistance, and from countries that voluntarily assume obligations of developed country Parties, to developing countries, in particular the least developed countries and small island developing States, as well as countries with economies in transition, to at least US$ 20 billion per year by 2025, and to at least US$ 30 billion per year by 2030;

(b) Significantly increasing domestic resource mobilization, facilitated by the preparation and implementation of national biodiversity finance plans or similar instruments according to national needs, priorities and circumstances;

(c) Leveraging private finance, promoting blended finance, implementing strategies for raising new and additional resources, and encouraging the private sector to invest in biodiversity, including through impact funds and other instruments;

(d) Stimulating innovative schemes such as payment for ecosystem services, green bonds, biodiversity offsets and credits, benefit-sharing mechanisms, with environmental and social safeguards;

(e) Optimizing co-benefits and synergies of finance targeting the biodiversity and climate crises;

(f) Enhancing the role of collective actions, including by indigenous peoples and local communities, Mother Earth centric actions* and non-market-based approaches including community based natural resource management and civil society cooperation and solidarity aimed at the conservation of biodiversity;

(g) Enhancing the effectiveness, efficiency and transparency of resource provision and use.

* Mother Earth Centric Actions: Ecocentric and rights based approach enabling the implementation of actions towards harmonic and complementary relationships between peoples and nature, promoting the continuity of all living beings and their communities and ensuring the non-commodification of environmental functions of Mother Earth.

Indicators

Headline indicators:

  • D.1 International public funding, including official development assistance (ODA) for conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity and ecosystems
  • D.2 Domestic public funding on conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity and ecosystems
  • D.3 Private funding (domestic and international) on conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity and ecosystems*

Component indicator:

  • -

Complementary indicators:

  • Foreign direct investment, official development assistance and South-South cooperation
  • Amount and composition of biodiversity-related finance reported to the OECD Creditor reporting system
  • Dollar value of financial and technical assistance (including through North-South, South-South and triangular cooperation) committed to developing countries
  • Dollar value of all resources made available to strengthen statistical capacity in developing countries
  • Amount of biodiversity-related philanthropic funding
  • Proportion of total research budget allocated to research in the field of marine technology
  • Total amount of approved funding for developing countries to promote the development, transfer, dissemination and diffusion of environmentally sound technologies
  • Number of countries (and number of instruments) with payments for ecosystem services (PES) programmes
  • Number of countries that have (a) assessed values of biodiversity in accordance with the Convention, (b) identified and reported funding needs, gaps and priorities, (c) developed national financial plans for biodiversity, (d) been provided with the necessary funding and capacity-building to undertake the above activities

Mapping with Strategic Plan for the Commission on Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture (2018-2027)

Target 3

By 2030, benefits arising from the utilization of genetic resources for food and agriculture and associated traditional knowledge are fairly and equitably shared, including by promoting appropriate access to genetic resources for food and agriculture, technology transfer and funding, thereby contributing to the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity for food and agriculture.
 

Mapping with 4th Ramsar Strategic Plan 2016-2024

Ramsar Target 3

The public and private sectors have increased their efforts to apply guidelines and good practices for the wise use of water and wetlands.

Baseline
  • 50% of Parties report actions taken to implement incentive measures that encourage the conservation and wise use of wetlands. (National Reports to COP12).
  • 37% of Parties report actions taken to remove perverse incentive measures that discourage conservation and wise use of wetlands. (National Reports to COP12).
  • 60% of Parties report private sector undertaking activities for the conservation, wise use and management of wetlands in general. (National Reports to COP12).
  • % of Parties have national Ramsar Committees that include both governmental and non-governmental representation. (Data source: new question for National Reports).
Indicator
  • % of Parties reporting actions taken to implement incentive measures that encourage the conservation and wise use of wetlands. (Data source: National Reports).
  • % of Parties reporting actions taken to remove perverse incentive measures that discourage conservation and wise use of wetlands. (Data source: National Reports).
  • % of Parties reporting private sector undertaking activities for the conservation, wise use and management of wetlands in general. (Data source: National Reports).
  • % of Parties having national Ramsar Committees that include both governmental and non-governmental representation. (Data source: new question for National Reports).
Ramsar Target 18

International cooperation is strengthened at all levels.

Baseline

Regional Initiatives

  • By COP12, [15] Regional Initiatives are in operation under the framework of the Ramsar Convention. (Ramsar Secretariat).
  • 68% of Parties have been involved in the development and implementation of a Regional Initiative under the framework of the Convention. (National Reports to COP12).

Other aspects of co-operation

  • 35% of Parties have established networks including twinning arrangements nationally or internationally for knowledge sharing and training for wetlands that share common features. (National Reports to COP12).
  • 33% of Parties have effective cooperative management in place for shared wetland systems (for example in shared river basins and coastal zones). (National Reports to COP12).
  • [XX]% of Parties have co-ordination mechanisms for the implementation of MEAs existing at a national level. (Data source: new question for National Reports).
  • At COP12, 168 Parties have acceded to the Ramsar Convention. (Report of the Secretary General to COP12 on the implementation of the Convention, COP12Doc8).
  • At COP12, [16] transboundary Ramsar Sites. (Data source: Ramsar Secretariat).
Indicator

Regional Initiatives

  • Number of Regional Initiatives successfully implemented. (Data source: National Reports).
  • % of Parties that have been involved in the development and implementation of a Regional Initiative under the framework of the Convention. (Data source: National Reports).

Other aspects of co-operation

  • % of Parties that have established networks including twinning arrangements nationally or internationally for knowledge sharing and training for wetlands that share common features. (Data source: National Reports).
  • % of Parties that have effective cooperative management in place for shared wetland systems (for example in shared river basins and coastal zones). (Data source: National Reports).
  • % of Parties where co-ordination mechanisms for the implementation of MEAs exist at a national level. (Data source: new question for National Reports).
  • Number of Parties which have acceded to the Ramsar Convention. (Data Source: National Reports).
  • Total number of transboundary Ramsar Sites. (Data source: Ramsar Sites Database).

Mapping with CBD - Aichi Targets

Aichi Target 1

By 2020, at the latest, people are aware of the values of biodiversity and the steps they can take to conserve and use it sustainably.

Aichi Target 2

By 2020, at the latest, biodiversity values have been integrated into national and local development and poverty reduction strategies and planning processes and are being incorporated into national accounting, as appropriate, and reporting systems.

Aichi Target 3

By 2020, at the latest, incentives, including subsidies, harmful to biodiversity are eliminated, phased out or reformed in order to minimize or avoid negative impacts, and positive incentives for the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity are developed and applied, consistent and in harmony with the Convention and other relevant international obligations, taking into account national socio economic conditions.

Aichi Target 5

By 2020, the rate of loss of all natural habitats, including forests, is at least halved and where feasible brought close to zero, and degradation and fragmentation is significantly reduced.

Aichi Target 8

By 2020, pollution, including from excess nutrients, has been brought to levels that are not detrimental to ecosystem function and biodiversity

Aichi Target 10

By 2015, the multiple anthropogenic pressures on coral reefs, and other vulnerable ecosystems impacted by climate change or ocean acidification are minimized, so as to maintain their integrity and functioning.

Aichi Target 13

By 2020, the genetic diversity of cultivated plants and farmed and domesticated animals and of wild relatives, including other socio-economically as well as culturally valuable species, is maintained, and strategies have been developed and implemented for minimizing genetic erosion and safeguarding their genetic diversity.

Aichi Target 14

By 2020, ecosystems that provide essential services, including services related to water, and contribute to health, livelihoods and well-being, are restored and safeguarded, taking into account the needs of women, indigenous and local communities, and the poor and vulnerable.

Aichi Target 15

By 2020, ecosystem resilience and the contribution of biodiversity to carbon stocks has been enhanced, through conservation and restoration, including restoration of at least 15 per cent of degraded ecosystems, thereby contributing to climate change mitigation and adaptation and to combating desertification.

Aichi Target 16

By 2015, the Nagoya Protocol on Access to Genetic Resources and the Fair and Equitable Sharing of Benefits Arising from their Utilization is in force and operational, consistent with national legislation.

Aichi Target 17

By 2015 each Party has developed, adopted as a policy instrument, and has commenced implementing an effective, participatory and updated national biodiversity strategy and action plan.